10 Ways to Use Flocabulary at the End of the Year

Check out the lyrics and more for Test-Taking Vocabulary.
At the end of the school year, schedules get weird, students get loopy and the activities that hooked kids all year suddenly aren’t working anymore. Whether you’re reviewing for finals or rewarding your students for a year of hard work, we’ve got a Flocabulary activity for you.

Ten End-of-year Flocabulary Activities

1. Review Test-Taking Vocabulary


Prep for final exams with our test-taking vocabulary song. The song defines key words like “compare,” “identify” and “infer” that students will likely see in the questions on their upcoming tests. Once the song is complete, click through lyrics and complete the accompanying test-taking vocab worksheet, which has students practice the test-taking words with fun examples.

2. Play Vocabulary Mini Games


Whether you’ve been using The Word Up Project, or learning vocabulary from a different source, you can still use our vocabulary mini games to review all the words your students have learned so far. The games include “Guess My Word,” “Conversation Competition” and more.

3. Time Travel Through History


If you have two weeks to go before your US History, Ancient World History or Modern World History exam, Flocabulary can help you review in just a few minutes each day. Watch one video on a topic and click the the lyrics. Is your exam sooner? Double or triple up on your videos. Either way, you’ll get all the key facts from each historical period.

4. Translate Flocabulary


Whether you teach foreign language classes, or have English language learners in your class, translate a Flocabulary song–or part of one–into another language. Get inspired by these Chinese grad students who translated Hip-Hop U.S. History. And then get started on your own.

 

5. Rap the School Year

What were the biggest events at your school this year? Use this lesson plan we wrote for The New York Times to create a rap about the most important events from the 2011-2012 school year. If there’s time, you could record the rap and share it with the school. Here’s one student example from “Chlocab”:

 

6. Integrate the Scientific Method in Everyday Life

The scientific method isn’t just used with beakers, test tubes and complicated apparatus. Students can use it to figure out everything from the best type of joke to tell their little brother to the best route to school. See the full lesson here, which includes our Scientific Method song.

 

7. Go On a Literacy Scavenger Hunt

Literacy doesn’t just happen in a library. Practice literacy skills all over town with this scavenger hunt. Analyze billboards, create a guidebook to your town and even educationally eavesdrop. See the 16 scavenger hunt assignments now.

 

8. Write a Vocabulary Skit

If you’ve been using vocabulary songs and videos from The Word Up Project, your students now know at least one hundred new words! Challenge students to write skits, or a full-length play, that use as many of the words as possible.

 

9. Hold a Math Facts Competition

In our Math Rap songs, the second verse gives students opportunities to say the answer before the rapper. Whether your students have mastered addition, subtraction, multiplication or division this year, challenge students to see how many problems they can solve before the rapper says the answer. See our math songs now.

 

10. Investigate Environmental Changes

As the temperatures heat up for summer, it is a good time to learn more about environmental science and changes. Begin with our song all about environmental change, and then assign small groups to research more information about different aspects of the environment.

 

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