Celebrate Financial Literacy Month with Flocab!

With April marking Financial Literacy Month, it’s a great time to get funky with some financial knowledge!

Back in the fall, we released a new video series for teaching financial literacy. Why financial literacy, you might wonder? We know that these concepts are very important for students (and adults), many of whom are starting their first jobs and thinking ahead about going to college. Personal finance knowledge is necessary for students preparing for their futures. At the same time, we know personal finance can be – we’ll say it – boring for young people. So when CUNY and HESC asked us to partner on the subject, we felt it was the perfect time to create a series of videos and classroom activities to support lessons on setting SMART goals, handling student loans and a bunch in between.

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We’ve had great conversations with teachers around the country using our video series about some of their best financial literacy lessons. We loved how these teachers were bringing financial literacy to life, so we had to share. We hope their ideas will inspire you as you plan your own ways to celebrate Financial Literacy Month!

  • “I used Flocabulary’s financial literacy video and worksheet on paying for college. The students were very into the video and after they completed their research, we were able to have discussions on why someone would choose to spend the extra money on a private school. After the research and discussion I had the students use the worksheet to write a one page paper comparing and contrasting the reasons to choose each of the levels of college.” – Theresa Snow, high school instructional support services, New York
  • “Every week we have a new “economics” word of the week. We then tie it into our word generation debates, using words used for every core area.” – Marie Green, 8th grade social studies teacher, Michigan
  • “I had the students create their own product and sell it to the rest of the class, keeping in mind that setting a realistic price that will help them sell their product was key. They were given guidelines to create their product and help was provided. They learned that when creating their price, it was wise to make it cost enough so they could make a profit, but not too much where they couldn’t sell it. All of the students then went “shopping” and had to stay within a given budget. The students had a blast and learned the power of advertising and how the customer is often deceived.” – Andrea Smolin, high school resource, personal finance, and inclusion English teacher, Virginia
  • “The first financial literacy lesson I led was related to understanding the stock market and how it relates to the everyday person. My students were thoroughly engaged as they pretended to be stockholders and business owners.” – Mechele Arnold, business education teacher, Georgia

Now, we want to hear from you – how are you making finance topics fun and relevant for your students? Post your lesson ideas and learnings in the comments below!

For more Financial Literacy Month resources, visit the JumpStart Coalition and The Council for Economic Education

Molly Cronin

Molly's love of education began when she landed her first job at age 17 as a preschool teacher's aide, where she changed countless diapers and led groups of toddlers in many a nursery rhyme. She studied communications, marketing, and education at Cornell University, where she wrote articles for university publications, co-hosted a radio show and led PR for a children's advocacy organization. After a stint in the crazy world of agency PR, she now blends her background in communications and her passion for education in her sales and partnership work at Flocabulary. When she's off Flocab duty, she can be found scouring food blogs and old cookbooks or traipsing around Alphabet City.

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